Noventa Padovana

Villa Giovanelli at Noventa Padovana

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The villa was perhaps designed by Antonio Gaspari, student of Baldassare Longhena, and was ordered by the brothers Giovanelli around the last quarter of the 17th century. Read More
Villa Giovanelli Noventa Padovana

Villa Giovanelli: the Giovanelli family, who were silk merchants from Bergamo, also joined the sphere of families who obtained registration as Venetian nobles through a financial gift they made to the Republic of Venice, which was fighting the Turks. The arrival of the family in Noventa Padovana around 1688 coincided with their acquisition of this noble title. The villa was perhaps designed by Antonio Gaspari, student of Baldassare Longhena, and was ordered by the brothers Giovanni Paolo and Giovanni Benedetto Giovanelli around the last quarter of the 17th century. The monumental structure is documented in two incisions by Vincenzo Soronelli and Volkamer, which portrayed the building with the jutting central part with a wide columned loggia on the piano nobile. Shortly after the façade was slightly altered by replacing the arched base of the loggia with the majestic flight of steps ornated with statues, which was probably designed by Giorgio Massari. The new entrance was built in 1738 when Maria Amalia from Saxony, daughter of the King of Poland Federico Augusto and future wife of Carlo di Borbone, came to visit. The interior decorations were also very sumptuous: the stuccowork in the main hall was originally by the Bolognese painter Ferdinando Fochi, and around fifty years later in 1747 Giuseppe Angeli painted the frescoes of some episodes of Roman history. The two rooms to the sides of the hall were frescoed at the beginning of the 18th century by two famous Venetian artists, Sebastiano Ricci and Giovanni Antonio Pellegrini. The former decorated the right hand room with a fake loggia where figures and statues were standing, and the latter decorated the left hand room with the story of Anthony and Cleopatra. With the beginning of Austrian domain and the progressive decline of the family, the villa was seriously damaged and the park and rear garden were completely destroyed during the bombing of the Second World War; the building is now part of the Sant’Antonio Village complex. There are still eight large paintings conserved inside, which were originally included within the stuccowork and were recovered between 1988 and 1998.